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Chemistry SE doesn't have many engineering questions as far as I can see but Physics SE has a lot of nuclear engineering and electrical engineering, however they arbitrarily reject some of such questions as engineering. Chemical SE should have a clear policy on which questions are OK and which are not.

Engineering fields is a considerable gap from the raw sciences- some parts without anything more an applied basis e.g. nuclear reactor control systems actual involve starting with the physics and then adding assumption after assumption (many) until its solveable while trying to avoid becoming totally non-physical.

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Firstly, Physics doesn't "arbitrarily reject" engineering questions, we have a rather clear cut policy on what we consider engineering. There may be some older questions that haven't gotten closed/locked, if you find them, please flag. We try not to allow electrical engineering questions, though concepts of electronics are OK. The same goes for nuclear engineering.

I think that the policy there is pretty reasonable and we can borrow it for Chemistry if necessary. The boundary between Chemistry and Chemical Engineering is pretty clear cut.

Not sure if we need to though. I don't recall having many engineering questions.

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    $\begingroup$ Not sure if I agree with your statement that the boundary between Chemistry and Chemical Engineering is pretty clear cut, but I do agree that we don't get many engineering questions here. $\endgroup$ Nov 11 '13 at 19:25
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The boundary between chemistry and chemical engineering is pretty clear cut, at least in the US and US-like systems… but a lot of fundamental physical chemistry is actually considered part of chemical engineering, and should be in my opinion perfectly acceptable here!

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Chemical engineering questions that are actually about fundamental chemical concepts do belong here. We get a few, but not many.

For example, this question: Balancing chemical systems - searching and sorting preliminary information is clearly about a process diagram typical of chemical engineering problems. However, the question boiled down to a very complex stoichiometry problem.

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I created a proposition for a dedicated chemical engineering community. You can help build it here: http://area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/65396/chemical-and-process-engineering

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