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Many of the homework, on hold, proposed to close, etc questions are from posters with a reputation of 1 or double digits. The situation appears to be that someone is either in a homework / coursework panic and just bangs a question on out of desperation or the question is ill defined. Either way, would putting in a minimum reputation requirement (of >1, 101?) help save moderators time in the long run, increase participation for people to build up the reputation and save space & time in the question lists while waiting for posts to get deleted or closed?

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think so.... just because many newbies post junkies doesn't mean all newbies post nonsense questions. Some of them are pretty genuine conceptual queries and some even rock the hot question table. Moreover, there is no need to think that only mods close question (that's rare); it's the whole community who in the form of 5 users close it after being sent at the review. So, I don't deem that would be necessary; rather it might act otherwise discouraging new ones having legitimate queries. $\endgroup$
    – user5764
    Apr 30 '16 at 13:42
  • $\begingroup$ 99% of people who visit this site for the first time are those who seeks an answer to their question. Turning them down will have a great effect on this site. $\endgroup$
    – manshu
    Apr 30 '16 at 13:50
  • $\begingroup$ I myself was a 1-rep asker not a very long time ago. :) I understand how you feel, especially after seeing lots of lousy questions, but having a rep requirement on asking would 100% have turned me away. Right now because the duties of moderation are shared by the whole community, it is not too time-consuming to close them, so it is fine. $\endgroup$
    – orthocresol Mod
    Apr 30 '16 at 14:58
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    $\begingroup$ Increasing the rep to post questions defeats the purpose of the site. This site is meant to help people in the end. Also, with this feature implemented you'd end up with poor souls who either post their questions as answers to others (NAA) or write wrong answers here and there in order to gain some rep to post their homework. This is like a self-slap from every aspect. $\endgroup$
    – M.A.R.
    Apr 30 '16 at 15:40
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    $\begingroup$ BTW downvotes on meta usually only reflect disagreement with a post and do not necessarily indicate post quality. $\endgroup$
    – M.A.R.
    Apr 30 '16 at 15:42
  • $\begingroup$ Fair enough! I was under the misapprehension that it took a while to close off the sub-par posts, but learning that it's community driven, changes things $\endgroup$
    – Beerhunter
    Apr 30 '16 at 16:21
  • $\begingroup$ @Beerhunter I think we've all entertained this idea at one time or another, but MAFIA's comment is pretty spot on. Takes little time to close and delete a question, so missing out on some great content is too big of a risk. As mentioned downvotes don't really "count" on Meta, so have no fear :) $\endgroup$
    – jonsca
    May 1 '16 at 1:23
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This is probably a really bad idea. Many new users come to this network, because they seek answers. They might stay because they get one. And while they are here they might answer questions themselves.

I would assume that in more than ninety percent of all cases one question started the chain.
If we take that away, users would only have the possibility to answer. Which will put those bad requests, which you are referring to, exactly where they do not belong. There would be a lot more to clean up.

Another reason is, that one of the principles of the network is, that you can try it without registering personal details. This would have to go over board.

Another point is, that such questions barely ever need a moderator to deal with them. They are closed by the community, they are automatically deleted by the system. And this system works very well.
Big thanks to everyone participating in the review queues.

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    $\begingroup$ Big thanks to people who give big thanks to everyone participating in the review queues. $\endgroup$
    – M.A.R.
    Apr 30 '16 at 15:40
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    $\begingroup$ Big thanks to people who give big thanks and the people that give... well, you get the idea :D $\endgroup$
    – jonsca
    May 1 '16 at 1:16
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Stackexchange’s model is:

Anyone can ask a question. Anyone can answer.

If you turn anyone into anyone with 10 rep, well … It’ll be us, the core crew and no new additions whatsoever. Because how are you supposed to accumulate 10 rep without asking or answering questions? Edit suggestions …? Think about it for a second and then cringe.

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