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I have asked the question Why are isotopes an issue in reading mass spectra? I then inserted a follow-up question, but another user rolled the edit back to a previous version (revisions). The user then posted the follow-up question under their name, i.e. my name does not appear as the person who asked the question: Significance of isotope mixtures for electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry

Is this a normal practice on this site?

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In general I would say the handling of this situation is not ideal; and, the resolution is somewhat uncommon.

From the timeline of your question I see that answers were posted and up-voted before you included your follow-up question. This is strongly discouraged, as it (at least partially) invalidates the existing answers, and may lead to a lot of confusion for users who come across the question for the first time. Chemistry Stack Exchange is not a forum; there is no back-and-forth exchange. It should be a concise question with equally concise answers.
The preferred way to deal with follow-up questions is to actually ask a new question, linking to the original question for context. In this way both questions stand on their own and do not invite confusion.
In that sense, rolling back the question was the right course of action.

If I had come about your question, I would have preferred to direct you to this preferred way via a comment, so that you would have the chance to post the question yourself. Karsten chose a different approach, of just separating the questions for you. I am sure he just wanted to help you out and make it easier for you. I think it is fine as no information is lost, albeit it is somewhat uncommon. Then again, these situations are uncommon in and of themselves.

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I deleted it so you can ask it again. Sorry about taking this shortcut.

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    $\begingroup$ I appreciate your kind efforts! $\endgroup$ – James Hong Jun 21 '19 at 5:57

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