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So I asked this question. But it got 2 downvoted with 5 views.

Which of the following alphabets have a five-membered chain as the longest chain? A, E, F, H, I, K, M, T, V, W, X, Y, Z?

a) A, E, H

b)E, M, W

c)K, M, X

d)F, W, Z

d) is the right answer.

Question is taken from "Elementry problems in Organic Chemistry" by MS Chauhan. Question number 6 page number 7.

I failed to understand what this question is trying to ask. Any hints are appreciated.

I can only find these three relevant links on a search.

https://edurev.in/question/667853/Which-of-the-following-alphabets-have-a-five-membe

https://brainly.in/app/ask?entry=similar&skip=4705194&q=Which+of+the+following+alphabet+have+a+five+membered+chain+as+a+longest+chain%3FA+E+F+H+I+K+M+T+V+W+X+Y+Z https://brainly.in/question/4582248

But they are don't answer the problem by giving an explanation.

How can I improve this question?

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I was about to post an answer here, mentioning that you should show some of your own effort, as downvoted questions usually lack original effort. However, I stopped midway only to realize that I myself don't understand the given question either!

The downvotes were most probably because the question is too ambiguous to be specifically answerable. Of course, that is not your own fault, and we fully understand that. However, we strive to preserve good quality questions on our site. And this does not seem like it is one of them. Hence, it got downvoted.

Either way, sadly I cannot see a way to make the question answerable given the current state it is in.

(This is based on the assumption that what you've posted here matches with what you had posted on the original question (that question has since been deleted voluntarily by you).)

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The reasons for why this question was not well received could stem from the fact that the question source is unclear, and it does appear as if you haven't taken significant effort of thought at it.

Bonus: Thinking of the alphabets as hydrocarbons (vertices=carbon) you may proceed. But it doesn't look like a decent question to me, seriously.

The answer (d) however does not fit this explanation. I would propose (b) instead.

I wouldn't suggest asking the question again if you've understood from here. It almost has nothing to do with any concept of chemistry.

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