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2020 has come! But… oops, where did the time go? It’s already March! Belated as it is, it’s time for a refresh of Community Promotion Ads!

What are Community Promotion Ads?

Community Promotion Ads are community-vetted advertisements that will show up on the main site, in the right sidebar. The purpose of this question is the vetting process. Images of the advertisements are provided, and community voting will enable the advertisements to be shown.

Why do we have Community Promotion Ads?

This is a method for the community to control what gets promoted to visitors on the site. For example, you might promote the following things:

  • interesting chemistry research sites
  • useful resources for practitioner and student alike
  • cool events or conferences
  • anything else your community would genuinely be interested in

The goal is for future visitors to find out about the stuff your community deems important. This also serves as a way to promote information and resources that are relevant to your own community's interests, both for those already in the community and those yet to join.

Why do we reset the ads every year?

Some services will maintain usefulness over the years, while other things will wane to allow for new faces to show up. Resetting the ads every year helps accommodate this, and allows old ads that have served their purpose to be cycled out for fresher ads for newer things. This helps keep the material in the ads relevant to not just the subject matter of the community, but to the current status of the community. We reset the ads once a year, every December.

The community promotion ads have no restrictions against reposting an ad from a previous cycle. If a particular service or ad is very valuable to the community and will continue to be so, it is a good idea to repost it. It may be helpful to give it a new face in the process, so as to prevent the imagery of the ad from getting stale after a year of exposure.

How does it work?

The answers you post to this question must conform to the following rules, or they will be ignored.

  1. All answers should be in the exact form of:

    [![Tagline to show on mouseover][1]][2]
    
       [1]: http://image-url
       [2]: http://clickthrough-url 
    

    Please do not add anything else to the body of the post. If you want to discuss something, do it in the comments.

  2. The question must always be tagged with the magic tag. In addition to enabling the functionality of the advertisements, this tag also pre-fills the answer form with the above required form.

Image requirements

  • The image that you create must be 300 x 250 pixels, or double that if high DPI.
  • Must be hosted through our standard image uploader (imgur)
  • Must be GIF or PNG
  • No animated GIFs
  • Absolute limit on file size of 150 KB
  • If the background of the image is white or partially white, there must be a 1px border (2px if high DPI) surrounding it.

Score Threshold

There is a minimum score threshold an answer must meet (currently 6) before it will be shown on the main site.

You can check out the ads that have met the threshold with basic click stats here.

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    $\begingroup$ No Twitter Ad, that's somewhat surprising... $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Mar 5 at 23:20
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    $\begingroup$ Some of the Twitter accounts have apparently been suspended, so while we work that out I thought it best to leave it out for all sites. $\endgroup$ – JNat Mar 6 at 11:14

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The LaTeX Project

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  • $\begingroup$ Why does LaTeX need an ad, and why is there an ad for reference 42? $\endgroup$ – user1271772 Mar 6 at 0:01
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    $\begingroup$ @user1271772 From my observation, way too many scientists in the field are utilizing office packages for scientific publishing because they are either not aware about advanced typography, or they believe $\mathrm\LaTeX$ is too complex and not worth their time. This is a demo attempting to demonstrate how real-life chemical typesetting problems can be solved [easier] with $\mathrm\LaTeX,$ hoping to convince more people to use a better tool for the job. As for the reference, it's barely visible and I doubt it counts as an ad within; anyway, the short answer is indeed 42. $\endgroup$ – andselisk Mar 6 at 3:12
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    $\begingroup$ I sincerely hope you didn't throw that together in a graphics program... :P $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Mar 6 at 12:42
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    $\begingroup$ @Martin-マーチン "Abandon hope all ye who enter here": I used an Inkscape SVG template for all ads I crafted. All illustrations were $\mathrm\LaTeX$-compiled, though the PDFs were thrown together in Inkscape. Yes, I'm lazy, and that's why I like $\mathrm\LaTeX$:) $\endgroup$ – andselisk Mar 6 at 13:27
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The Periodic Table. Come chat with us!

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    $\begingroup$ xkcd.com/1015 $\endgroup$ – user7951 Mar 6 at 20:31
  • $\begingroup$ @Loong It's chemistry with tea and T, obviously. (I'd change it, but I have no idea where the original is. It's too old.) $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Mar 7 at 14:05
  • $\begingroup$ @Martin-マーチン Mainly visible in "Table": i.stack.imgur.com/w0zRs.png $\endgroup$ – user7951 Mar 7 at 14:13
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    $\begingroup$ What's a syllable? "Haikus" have two or three? Does the poem scan? $\endgroup$ – James K Aug 8 at 11:48
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    $\begingroup$ @JamesK "Syllables" have three, "Haikus" has indeed just two. Are you surprised? $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Aug 8 at 15:46
  • $\begingroup$ The Japanese word, ha-i-ku has three not two, languages differ. $\endgroup$ – James K Aug 8 at 15:58
  • $\begingroup$ @JamesK That is a technicality, which would possibly take away too much from the artform, but indeed, written out in hiragana, you'd count three characters. The concept of syllables is foreign to Japanese. The poem itself is written in English, so I'd say the interpretation of the used term allows it for two. But I really liked what you have commented. :D $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Aug 8 at 16:12
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MarvinSketch

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    $\begingroup$ I really, really wanted to like this, but I hate it so much. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Mar 7 at 16:22
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shapecatcher.com

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Visit our meta site!

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A new SE site for those interested in computationally modeling materials

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  • $\begingroup$ Based on the response on Physics, it sounds like ad block is obscuring the image for some people (though it seems like the click through works fine). I'll see if changing the link for the image can get it past the ad block filter. $\endgroup$ – Tyberius Mar 6 at 0:25
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    $\begingroup$ @Martin any better now? I used a URL that doesn't have the word "ad" in it, which I assume was the issue. $\endgroup$ – Tyberius Mar 6 at 0:31
  • $\begingroup$ @Tyberius It is indeed the AdBlock targeting that image. I wasn't even aware it's turned on. With the obfuscated link (which won't update though) it works just fine. So that's a bit a question of taste here what to do... $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Mar 6 at 12:40
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NIST CompChem Comparison & Benchmark Database

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Zotero

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Olex2

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VESTA

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