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I asked a question in Chemistry StackExchange about mathematical and physical fundamentals that one should know before learning physical chemistry but it keeps getting closed as it appears to be opinion-based even after editing it two times. The main thing I ask for in my question is advice on how to prepare for physical chemistry and which literature might be helpful. How can I improve my question to make it less opinion-based?

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    $\begingroup$ It's inherently off-topic and sites like this one aren't well suited for this, so just ask for example at library, or more experienced friends. $\endgroup$ – Mithoron May 16 '20 at 17:04
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    $\begingroup$ To me, the problem is in what you said: "I haven't taken any maths or physics courses yet." So where to start? Can it be assumed you know basic algebra? Do you know the beginning parts of calculus? If the answer is no to these two questions, then you know you have learn that material, even if only to do well in a first year chemistry course at university or college level. Then physical chemistry, which is what I earned my PhD in, will involve much more math and physics. So I strongly second the answer by @andselisk and wish you success in your studies, but there is no royal road ahead. $\endgroup$ – Ed V May 17 '20 at 2:16
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My brief personal opinion is that questions like this are always going to be somewhat opinion-based as every person's learning curve is different. The books that are universally decent are already listed in Resources for learning Chemistry, or can be found on Amazon or an equivalent online book store offering ratings and reviews.

It's the same as to ask what Linux distro is the best for the beginners. The answer would be that there is none: just take the first one and try to learn as many new things as possible from it. When you finally feel like it has nothing extra to learn, switch to another one. Also, find and solve real-life problems: it's practice that makes perfect.

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    $\begingroup$ I've seen this list but since there's so many resources listed there it's hard finding a starting point. Additionally, my specific problem is that I do not want to start with a physical chemistry book immediately but rather ones that cover basic mathematical methods and physical principles that I can later apply to chemistry. $\endgroup$ – jona173 May 16 '20 at 16:12

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