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For example, should we make sure all instances of "sulphur hexafluoride" are all lowercase, all first case ("Sulphur Hexafluoride"), or just leave it however the author wrote it?

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    $\begingroup$ So long as search works properly, I don't think capitalization makes too much of a difference. The spelling (sulfur vs sulphur) is probably more important for search purposes... $\endgroup$ – Andrew Apr 28 '12 at 17:31
  • $\begingroup$ @Andrew how about you make that an answer, so we can upvote (or downvote) it to gauge the general agreement? $\endgroup$ – F'x Apr 28 '12 at 21:39
  • $\begingroup$ @F'x, good idea, done! $\endgroup$ – Andrew Apr 29 '12 at 1:03
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I'm going to say we should not capitalize the full names; per Wikipedia:

In former versions of the IUPAC recommendations, names were written with a capital initial letter. This practice has been abandoned in later publications. The names of chemical compounds and chemical elements when written out, are common nouns in English, rather than proper nouns. They are capitalized at the beginning of a sentence or title, but not elsewhere.

Elements and formulas (He, NO2, ...) should, of course, adhere to the proper capitalization.

However, I would also suggest that having a capitalized name or two is not alone sufficient reason to edit a post, but if you are editing it anyway, do normalize the capitalization.

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I think that capitalization isn't a big problem because the site's search function will find any form of the same words.

More importantly, we should probably standardize between American and British spelling (sulphur vs sulfur) so that one search finds all of the relevant questions/answers.

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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps a feature request (though unlikely to be granted) that will actually alias the spellings (for the elements)? $\endgroup$ – soandos Apr 29 '12 at 3:51
  • $\begingroup$ British of course. No matter what IUPAC says. $\endgroup$ – Canageek May 27 '12 at 1:09

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